Art lifts your soul

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Roitzsch_GroupPhoto_2020

Dear  Friends                                                                                               I am so excited to introduce my new body of artistic expression with you. It has been a long time of creative drought for me. Dealing with my Mom’s illness and death left me drained and reevaluating my whole life. This required all of my “creative” energy. But finally after last Thanksgiving the creative juices have been flowing again, leaving me very grateful, excited and curious.
I am exploring the realm of hanging, moving sculpture- the Art Mobile.

Are you ready to get outside and take in beautiful sculptures?
My copper Mobiles will be part of this exhibit:
CLARITY 2020

Featuring Stephen Porter with thirty other outstanding artists

Hawk Ridge Farm Pownal, Maine

June 1st– July 19th, 2020

Outdoors and by appointment only
Give June LaCombe a call or email, so she can assure that there are not too many people walking the sculpture trail at the same time and feeding their soul with beautiful art.
Call: 207-688-4468 or Email: june.lacombe@gmail.com

2Roitzsch_1_UnderFullSail_2020 Why Mobiles?
In these uncertain and sometimes very depressing times, we all can use something to lift up our spirits and giving lightness to our souls.
This is what the mobiles are doing for me and I am certain it will have a similar effect on you. Waking up to the colorful shapes, suspended in the air, makes me start the day with a big smile on my face.  Watching the gentle movement feels so mesmerizing and meditative. It calms the nervous system, quiets the nagging thought patterns and awakens curiosity, appreciation and joy. In other words, it can be the perfect wellness tool for troubled times 🙂
“Under Full Sail” hammered copper. Read more with this link

POETICS OF PLACE- SCULPTURE SHOW

Antje Roitzsch will be represented with 6 Sculptures at this show:
Lucent Journey

Constance Rush, Lucent Journey, marble, 10 x 28 x 8 inches

Hawk Ridge Farm
Pownal, Maine
June 6th – July 26th, 2015
Opening Reception Saturday June 6th, 4:00-6:00 pm

 

When a sculpture is carefully sited on the landscape, both the piece and the place resonate in new ways. This exhibition and sale features sculpture by fifty New England artists shown in a country home and surrounding meadows, historic gardens and a woodland trail. Visit this exhibition to select sculpture for your home and garden and join us for our Maple Tree Talks.

 

Open by appointment with Open Houses Sunday afternoons from 2:00 – 400 pm
June.lacombe@gmail.com 207-688-4468

Do you support Art that inspires you?

the crushed stone gives the sculpture a nice base to sit on

Have you been inspired by a painting, drawing or a sculpture? Has a handmade item moved you? Did a poem speak to you? Were you touched deeply by a performance? Is Music part of your life?

If it is the performing arts, visual arts, poetry, the crafts or music, they all play an important part in our lives.

But there is a disconnect about the willingness to pay for it.

How do the artists get paid for their work? How can they sustain the creative process?

Every area mentioned above has its own challenges and common practices that may or may not work. Since I am an expert in the visual arts, this will be my area of focus at the moment.

The most common line I hear as a visual artist is: “I love it, this is so inspiring- BUT I can’t afford it.” Meaning, the artwork did it’s part- it created inspiration, joy, curiosity, engagement. These interactions of appreciation make that artwork complete. That is why I do art- to touch someone. BUT while it is feeding my soul, it doesn’t feed my belly. I know I can’t expect everybody that is touched by my work to buy a $700 or $3.000 sculpture. Not every household even has room for another $150 drawing.

Can the focus of monetary exchange shift from owning artwork to the experience of artwork? When you enjoy a concert, you pay a ticket for the experience of it- you don’t own the piece of music. And if you are moved enough, you buy a CD (or what ever newer technology is now available) to recreate the experience again and again.  While the music industry has its own struggles, at least there is the attempt of © copyright and the rule of payment for the experience or use of the music.

(Museums do charge admission to experience artwork. But they are in a different category and raise future questions of – what makes art important enough to be collected by a museum. And what does it mean for artists that are not included in the official art world. That would have to be a topic of future contemplations)

Coming back to common practices. Often artists are asked to donate their work to auctions and fundraisers. (Those donations are not even tax deductible for the artist) The motivation is the exposure to a new audience to build name recognition. The hope is that at some point someone might want to buy a piece from that artist. Sometimes the artist will receive a minimum set price from an auction, which might cover the materials. But more often nothing will come back to the artist.

Spiraling is installed at threefold Education Center in Spring Valley, NY

Spiraling is installed at threefold Education Center in Spring Valley, NY

Coffee shops, offices, banks, health centers. libraries and other public or commercial places have figured out that art enhances their walls and atmosphere. Visitors and customers love to be surrounded by art and will patronize venues where they feel good. Office staff benefits from being surrounded by the positive vibrations of art and be more easy going, engaged and productive. What is in it for the artist? All the venues fill one need- to be a stage for the work to be seen and to be interacted with by the observer. Although the artist only can experience this benefit during an artist reception, if the venue is gracious enough to offer it. Often enough the artist has to put the event on themselves as well.

The artist spends hours installing the shows….. then what? Oh, the pieces can be offered for sale. Which happens on an extremely rare occasion.

Public gardens are starting to join the trend and are happy to host sculpture shows. Again, art needs to be seen and needs a stage. Contrary to 2 dimensional work, sculptures need to be transported in trucks- and often need machinery to be installed, boom trucks and the like. Who covers the cost for that? The artist. Or if lucky the venue will pay for the boom truck. but not the delivery.

As we look at this phenomenon of the value of art and reimbursement/payment, artists themselves need to change their common practices. Art work needs to be seen and therefore are most artists all too eager to get a chance to show their work, free of charge. If artwork was not so readily available for free, the practice of renting or other monetary exchanges might be more common.

As mentioned above, those shows are a great service to the public, but they are not sustainable for the artists. If something is given for free, it has to be acknowledged and not expected and taken for granted. Some form of exchange needs to happen that feeds the artist- spiritually, their creative life force and literally their body.

Here is a simply suggestion of one way it could work on a small scale:

Any time you are moved, inspired or touched by artwork of any kind, consider making a contribution to the artist. Think of it as a movie ticket, the price of admission, a cup of coffee. $5, 10, 20, 80…. what ever you easily spend on those items. – And repeat this on a monthly basis.

Places now hosting art shows could start to budget an installation fee to reimburse the artist at least for the time of the installation. Entering into a rental agreement for the artwork might be a possible alternative, depending on the venue. In addition they can install a collection box and encourage the public to contribute the above-mentioned donations to the artist.  This acknowledges the artist as a contributor to society. If enough people participate, the artist might actually be able to afford to donate work to your favorite fundraiser or other public display.

with rust patina

Spiral dance-with rust patina

There are many creative options when one begins to think about it. Let’s keep a conversation going and try out the first ideas.

What are your ideas as an admirer of art? How willing are you to acknowledge the importance of art in your life and engage in an energy exchange?

How willing are you as an artist to change your habits and claim your worth to society.

Feather Dance

This is a new sculpture, done in May 2012 and installed at the Maine Botanical Garden in Boothbay.  The show “Wings” was curated by June LaComb.

model for Feather Dance

Feather Dance done

with rust patina

I think it ended up being about 7 x 3 x 3′

Feather Dance installed at Maine Botanical Garden in Boothbay

Me and Feather Dance

New Leaf 2

This sculpture was made in May and is installed at Hawk Ridge Farm for the show Metal and Stone. June LaComb curated the show.

New Leaf 2, made out of steel rod

side view

installed at Hawk Ridge, Maine

New Leaf 2 dimensions are about 5 x 3 x 2′

the patina is beautiful orangy rust

Sculpture Journal 4/46/10

Here are more detailed views of the 3 sculptures shown in NJ at the Designer Showcase:

"Passage", side view, 7 x 10.5 x 10.5"

the same piece- from below

from above

Abstract I, I still could use another name for this piece

side view, 14,5 x 14 x 9"

another view

Harmony, 25.5 x 12 x 8"

side view

3/4 view

Sculpture Journal 4/12/10

I made it!!!

All three pieces for the New Jersey show are done.  It was a little push to get everything sculpted.  Then the drying was out of my hands.  Fortunately we had a little sunshine and they all took a turn sitting in the car to get really nice and warm and help with the drying.  The painting went smooth too.  Today I picked up the black bases.  It makes such a difference.  They look very nice and finished now, and the proportions to each other are great as well.  I hope I will see pictures of the chest they will be standing on.  I am crossing my fingers that it actually looks great.

Tomorrow everything will get wrapped up and off it goes….

The Trio is all done

different view

Sculpture Journal 3/26/10

I am working on 3 sculptures for a show in NJ.  All of them are made out of hydrocal.

Armatures for the 3 sculptures and the space available

"Abstract I" This piece still needs another name....

made out of hydrocal

smooth finish, it will be painted white

"Harmony"

this one has a textured finish to it

also painted white once it dries

Sculpture Journal 3/21/2010

Hanging sculpture at Ashwood Waldorf School in Rockport Maine

I just installed a sculpture in the main entry at the Ashwood School.  I think it is perfect for the space.  And it moves very nicely in the wind.  The piece still needs a name and I hope the students will come up with something fitting.

sculpture out of copper tubing

view from below

it moves nicely in the wind

just above the main entry

it is even visible form the parking lot

Sculpture in Winter

Balance and Swing in Snow

The following text was published in the Newsletter of Merryspring Nature Center.  It also introduces the idea of renting a sculpture

Sculpture in Winter

Winter is such a beautiful time to enjoy our gardens in a more quiet way.  Winter draws our attention to the core, the essential, the structure.  Trees and shrubs reveal their essence.

The same is true for the sculptures in Merryspring’s gardens.  When the snow is covering all the plant life, even the lower shrubs, the sculptures stand out by themselves, framed sometimes by nearby bushes or trees, or just standing in open space.  Depending on the snow level, the lower parts of the sculpture even disappear.  Right after a storm, fresh snow can play with the linear forms of the piece.  On a sunny day, a moving shadow will play around the sculpture throughout the day.  There is a lot to be noticed and discovered.  Please take the time and enjoy this unique opportunity to admire and interact with the sculptures during nature’s quiet time.

Created by artist Antje Roitzsch, the sculptures have been on display at Merryspring since last summer. “Spiral dance” poses in front of the Ross Center; “Balance and Swing” sits on the boulder in the back of the building.  “New Leaf” stands in the rock garden; “Harmony” spreads out in the herb garden; and “Uprising” takes center stage in the lawn behind the lilies. “Flowering” shoots up in the children’s garden; and “Spiraling” hangs in the locust tree in front of the hexagon. Each sculpture goes well in its specific surroundings, as if it belongs there.

And that could happen, if you or other members wish to purchase a piece for Merryspring.  “Keeping in Motion,” which was in the hexagon, has already left the exhibit and will soon be hanging at the Rockland Library.  The artist’s goal for these sculptures is to have them continue bringing joy to people and to be accessible to the public.  However, if someone falls in love with a piece and decides to purchase it, a portion of the sales price would be given to Merryspring as a donation.

In addition, beginning in the spring, the pieces may be rented, either through the summer or for the whole year.  The artist also is available to come to your property and site the sculpture to assist in optimal display.  Rental fees start from $30.00 per month, with a six-month minimum. You may try out a sculpture before you buy it with a “rent to buy option.” For more details,please call Antje at 542-4285 or e-mail her at info@visualartsmaine.com.

If you would like to know more about the background of the Art, Nature and Design Exhibit with beautiful photographs of each sculpture, a book is available at http://www.blurb.com Search for the title of the book: Art, Nature and Design. Action shots of the metal bending process are included.