June 7, Sculpture show at Wells Reserve at Laudholm

The following show will be a great excuse to take a ride to beautiful Wells. I will be represented with 2 sculptures.

I am looking forward to seeing you there.

Antje Roitzsch

Sentinel III by Gary Haven Smith
June LaCombe Sculpture
POWER OF PLACE
Wells Reserve at Laudholm
Wells, Maine
Opening Reception Wednesday June 7th from 4:30-6:30pm
Music by Los Galactacos
 
Coastal rolling fields and woodland trails offer dramatic settings for 65 outdoor sculptures in granite, steel, marble and bronze by New England artists.


 
Dave Allen, Anne Alexander, Lise Becu, John Bowdren, Ray Carbone, Kate Cheney Chappell, Miles Chapin, Dan Dowd, Peter Dransfield, Paul Heroux, Mark Herrington, Andreas von Huene, Eugene Koch, Wendy Klemperer, Cabot Lyford, Jean Noon, Jac Ouellette, Roy Patterson, Meg Brown Payson, Mark Pettegrow, Patrick Plourde, Stephen Porter, Antje Roitzsch, Constance Rush, Cat Schwenk, George Sherwood, Gary Haven Smith, Jordan Smith, Cynthia Stroud, Sharon Townshend, Digby Veevers-Carter, Dan West, Melita Westerlund, John Wilkinson, Joyce Audy Zarins.
 June LaCombe SCULPTURE 

Sculpture Shows, May 20th and June 7th

Bring Art into your life- Enjoy wonderful 3 dimensional sculptural work.

On May 20th you have a chance to visit the beautiful sculpture garden at Hawk Ridge Farm for “Embracing Earth”. A number of my pieces are included in the show.  The image below is “Spring Series #1”, a piece that is hammered out of a flat sheet of copper.

I look forward to meeting you at the opening. Or you will enjoy a stroll through the wooded sculpture path at any other time you can make it. More information is below.

Another sculpture show “Power of Place” will open on June 7th in Wells Reserve at Laudholm Wells. I am still working on a piece that will be included in that show. I can’t wait to finish it and have you be able to see and interact with it.

Enjoy the slow coming spring.  Antje

IMG_2982_3

New work by Gary Haven Smith
EMBRACING EARTH
Hawk Ridge Farm Pownal, Maine
May 20th – July 23rd, 2017
May Wine Opening Reception 
Saturday, May 20 th 4:30-6:30pm
with Steve Lindsay at the piano
Sculpture by New England artists shown in country home and gardens and along woodland trail.   

Sunday afternoon open houses from 1pm-4pm.

   

Maple Tree talks listed on website. Open by Appointment. 
Save the Dates
 
GARY HAVEN SMITH
Ogunquit Museum of American Art Ogunquit,  Maine
May 1st – October 31st, 2017
POWER OF PLACE
Wells Reserve at Laudholm Wells, Maine
May 26th – October 16th, 2017
Opening Reception Wednesday, June 7  th 4:30-6:30pm


June LaCombe SCULPTURE 

POETICS OF PLACE- SCULPTURE SHOW

Antje Roitzsch will be represented with 6 Sculptures at this show:
Lucent Journey

Constance Rush, Lucent Journey, marble, 10 x 28 x 8 inches

Hawk Ridge Farm
Pownal, Maine
June 6th – July 26th, 2015
Opening Reception Saturday June 6th, 4:00-6:00 pm

 

When a sculpture is carefully sited on the landscape, both the piece and the place resonate in new ways. This exhibition and sale features sculpture by fifty New England artists shown in a country home and surrounding meadows, historic gardens and a woodland trail. Visit this exhibition to select sculpture for your home and garden and join us for our Maple Tree Talks.

 

Open by appointment with Open Houses Sunday afternoons from 2:00 – 400 pm
June.lacombe@gmail.com 207-688-4468

Do you support Art that inspires you?

the crushed stone gives the sculpture a nice base to sit on

Have you been inspired by a painting, drawing or a sculpture? Has a handmade item moved you? Did a poem speak to you? Were you touched deeply by a performance? Is Music part of your life?

If it is the performing arts, visual arts, poetry, the crafts or music, they all play an important part in our lives.

But there is a disconnect about the willingness to pay for it.

How do the artists get paid for their work? How can they sustain the creative process?

Every area mentioned above has its own challenges and common practices that may or may not work. Since I am an expert in the visual arts, this will be my area of focus at the moment.

The most common line I hear as a visual artist is: “I love it, this is so inspiring- BUT I can’t afford it.” Meaning, the artwork did it’s part- it created inspiration, joy, curiosity, engagement. These interactions of appreciation make that artwork complete. That is why I do art- to touch someone. BUT while it is feeding my soul, it doesn’t feed my belly. I know I can’t expect everybody that is touched by my work to buy a $700 or $3.000 sculpture. Not every household even has room for another $150 drawing.

Can the focus of monetary exchange shift from owning artwork to the experience of artwork? When you enjoy a concert, you pay a ticket for the experience of it- you don’t own the piece of music. And if you are moved enough, you buy a CD (or what ever newer technology is now available) to recreate the experience again and again.  While the music industry has its own struggles, at least there is the attempt of © copyright and the rule of payment for the experience or use of the music.

(Museums do charge admission to experience artwork. But they are in a different category and raise future questions of – what makes art important enough to be collected by a museum. And what does it mean for artists that are not included in the official art world. That would have to be a topic of future contemplations)

Coming back to common practices. Often artists are asked to donate their work to auctions and fundraisers. (Those donations are not even tax deductible for the artist) The motivation is the exposure to a new audience to build name recognition. The hope is that at some point someone might want to buy a piece from that artist. Sometimes the artist will receive a minimum set price from an auction, which might cover the materials. But more often nothing will come back to the artist.

Spiraling is installed at threefold Education Center in Spring Valley, NY

Spiraling is installed at threefold Education Center in Spring Valley, NY

Coffee shops, offices, banks, health centers. libraries and other public or commercial places have figured out that art enhances their walls and atmosphere. Visitors and customers love to be surrounded by art and will patronize venues where they feel good. Office staff benefits from being surrounded by the positive vibrations of art and be more easy going, engaged and productive. What is in it for the artist? All the venues fill one need- to be a stage for the work to be seen and to be interacted with by the observer. Although the artist only can experience this benefit during an artist reception, if the venue is gracious enough to offer it. Often enough the artist has to put the event on themselves as well.

The artist spends hours installing the shows….. then what? Oh, the pieces can be offered for sale. Which happens on an extremely rare occasion.

Public gardens are starting to join the trend and are happy to host sculpture shows. Again, art needs to be seen and needs a stage. Contrary to 2 dimensional work, sculptures need to be transported in trucks- and often need machinery to be installed, boom trucks and the like. Who covers the cost for that? The artist. Or if lucky the venue will pay for the boom truck. but not the delivery.

As we look at this phenomenon of the value of art and reimbursement/payment, artists themselves need to change their common practices. Art work needs to be seen and therefore are most artists all too eager to get a chance to show their work, free of charge. If artwork was not so readily available for free, the practice of renting or other monetary exchanges might be more common.

As mentioned above, those shows are a great service to the public, but they are not sustainable for the artists. If something is given for free, it has to be acknowledged and not expected and taken for granted. Some form of exchange needs to happen that feeds the artist- spiritually, their creative life force and literally their body.

Here is a simply suggestion of one way it could work on a small scale:

Any time you are moved, inspired or touched by artwork of any kind, consider making a contribution to the artist. Think of it as a movie ticket, the price of admission, a cup of coffee. $5, 10, 20, 80…. what ever you easily spend on those items. – And repeat this on a monthly basis.

Places now hosting art shows could start to budget an installation fee to reimburse the artist at least for the time of the installation. Entering into a rental agreement for the artwork might be a possible alternative, depending on the venue. In addition they can install a collection box and encourage the public to contribute the above-mentioned donations to the artist.  This acknowledges the artist as a contributor to society. If enough people participate, the artist might actually be able to afford to donate work to your favorite fundraiser or other public display.

with rust patina

Spiral dance-with rust patina

There are many creative options when one begins to think about it. Let’s keep a conversation going and try out the first ideas.

What are your ideas as an admirer of art? How willing are you to acknowledge the importance of art in your life and engage in an energy exchange?

How willing are you as an artist to change your habits and claim your worth to society.

Demonstration during Artisan Tour

Lori Lacy and Antje Roitzsch are demonstrating their techniques during the Artisan Tour.

We will be in the studio again tomorrow- bring your curiosity and questions.

Lori Lacy is showing how to anodize her Titanium jewelry

Lori Lacy is showing how to anodize her Titanium jewelry

Lori is putting resist onto the titanium in areas that should not get colored

Lori is putting resist onto the titanium in areas that should not get colored

Antje is showing the first step of foldforming.

Antje is showing the first step of foldforming.

forging the folded earring

forging the folded earring

opening up the fold

opening up the fold

Ariadne earrings in different stages: pattern, folded and hammered, opened, and finished shape

Ariadne earrings in different stages: pattern, folded and hammered, opened, and finished shape

The Healing Power of Art

The Healing Power of Art

Creating Art can be healing.  Observing, interacting with Art can be healing as well.  Antje Roitzsch’s sculptures are created to be touched, and this way appreciated and understood on many different levels.

Her intuitive drawings are a way to tap into the creative process.  They also are a tool to express feelings and process the state of the hear and now.

Antje also walks through nature with her camera as part of her meditative practice.

More of her work can be found at http://www.visualartsmaine.com

 

Feather Dance

This is a new sculpture, done in May 2012 and installed at the Maine Botanical Garden in Boothbay.  The show “Wings” was curated by June LaComb.

model for Feather Dance

Feather Dance done

with rust patina

I think it ended up being about 7 x 3 x 3′

Feather Dance installed at Maine Botanical Garden in Boothbay

Me and Feather Dance